Revolutionary War document transcription help

I am having difficulty transcribing these words on an pension application for a Revolutionary war soldier. The application is dated June 11,1836 and I am not able to find any cross references to transcribe  (as I see it) “Penajents” or “Dut Cola”.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

Parents
  • What I see this said "Letter to Penajents Dic Colu of New York City, June 11, 1836."

  • The problem with that interpretation is that there's no context for "Dic Colu," let alone being "of" New York City.  If It's either a person's name or a place name, it makes no sense given this particular pension application.

    In this cursive hand, all the letters in the individial words are connected - you can see that despite the distance, the "Yor" and "k" in "York" are still connected - and there's a clear break between the "n" in "Pen" and the "a" in "ajents." (Or "agents" - standardized spelling is not something you can count on during this era. While Webster's An American Dictionary of the English Language with its "reformed" or standardized spellings was published in 1828, Ellis's A Plea for Phonetic Spelling, published in 1848, i.e. a good 12 years after these lines were written, is a clear indication of pushback against it.)

    Aside from there being no "o" here, there's no cursive letter that resembles what you see as the "f" in "of." If it's meant to be an "f," then it's backwards. While there's a purpose to hastily abbreviate larger words like "District" and "Columbia" when its known that the reader of this application will understand their meaning, there really isn't one to abbreviating a two-letter word like "of" so that it's illegible. It also doesn't make sense, as what exactly is "of New York City" supposed to refer to? Certainly not the District of Columbia.

    What it does resemble is an ampersand.  Up until 1835, the year before this was written, there were actually 27 letters in the American English alphabet - the logogram for the ampersand [&] was the 27th, and originated as a ligature of the letters of the word et (Latin for "and") combined into a single glyph. There were a lot of written variants of that glyph, such as this single-stroke plus-shaped sign, and it also makes sense when read as "and."

Reply
  • The problem with that interpretation is that there's no context for "Dic Colu," let alone being "of" New York City.  If It's either a person's name or a place name, it makes no sense given this particular pension application.

    In this cursive hand, all the letters in the individial words are connected - you can see that despite the distance, the "Yor" and "k" in "York" are still connected - and there's a clear break between the "n" in "Pen" and the "a" in "ajents." (Or "agents" - standardized spelling is not something you can count on during this era. While Webster's An American Dictionary of the English Language with its "reformed" or standardized spellings was published in 1828, Ellis's A Plea for Phonetic Spelling, published in 1848, i.e. a good 12 years after these lines were written, is a clear indication of pushback against it.)

    Aside from there being no "o" here, there's no cursive letter that resembles what you see as the "f" in "of." If it's meant to be an "f," then it's backwards. While there's a purpose to hastily abbreviate larger words like "District" and "Columbia" when its known that the reader of this application will understand their meaning, there really isn't one to abbreviating a two-letter word like "of" so that it's illegible. It also doesn't make sense, as what exactly is "of New York City" supposed to refer to? Certainly not the District of Columbia.

    What it does resemble is an ampersand.  Up until 1835, the year before this was written, there were actually 27 letters in the American English alphabet - the logogram for the ampersand [&] was the 27th, and originated as a ligature of the letters of the word et (Latin for "and") combined into a single glyph. There were a lot of written variants of that glyph, such as this single-stroke plus-shaped sign, and it also makes sense when read as "and."

Children
No Data